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Majumdar’s debut, a 2020 bestseller, is a tale of contemporary India, in which a Muslim girl from a slum neighborhood is accused of a terrorist attack after a careless Facebook comment. “Immaculately constructed, acidly observed and gripping from start to finish, ‘A Burning’ is a brilliant debut,” wrote a reviewer in The Guardian. “The novel is both a crime thriller in which Jivan battles to avoid execution, and a moral drama: will her old acquaintances risk their burgeoning careers to speak up for a vilified Muslim woman?”

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Inspired by his real-life stint as Carrie Fisher’s personal assistant, Byron Lane’s debut novel has at its center a Los Angeles writer named Charlie who takes a job as assistant to Kathi Kannon, star of the cult-favorite science fiction film “Nova Quest.”

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By Yan Lianke, translated by Carlos Rojas (Grove Atlantic, $16). The author of “The Day the Sun Died” and winner of the Franz Kafka Prize writes about his family members’ struggles with poverty during the Chinese Cultural Revolution. “Throughout the book, Yan depicts his provincial relatives with enormous heart and respect, acknowledging their sacrifices in a dark yet poignant meditation on grief and death,” wrote a Kirkus reviewer.

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Samantha Power, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of “‘A Problem from Hell’: America and the Age of Genocide,” here tells her life’s journey from her Dublin childhood to stints in the Obama administration and United Nations.

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Perfect for YA readers: High school, how bad can it get? Well, blackmail, cheating, gossip, manipulation, lying, police brutality, racism and murder. The novels of Thomas, McManus and Urban take us back to those gruesome-as-only-high-school-can-be days where everything seems to be high-stakes and intensely important, but sometimes, more than feelings get hurt. One reviewer described McManus’s “One of Us Is Lying” as “‘Pretty Little Liars’ meets ‘The Breakfast Club.’” (If I remember correctly, my high school was just like that.) And talk about game-playing: Urban’s Christie-esque “All Your Twisted Secrets” brings a group of students into a deadly real-life game of Clue. And in “The Hate U Give,” Thomas makes worlds collide in her timely and honest examination of how the pressure to balance your identity as a student at a fancy prep school, your racial identity and your identity at home can turn into an intense, life-changing drama.

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You just might need the warm, chatty delights of a Lipman novel. This one, her 11th, is about an old yearbook that goes astray, causing troubles for its owner’s grown daughter and the busybody documentary filmmaker who finds it. A New York Times reviewer described it as “a caper novel, light as a feather and effortlessly charming” and said it “inspires a very specific kind of modern joy.”

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From the Seattle-based author of “Alif the Unseen” comes this historical fantasy, set in the royal court of Granada during the Spanish Inquisition and featuring the friendship between a concubine and a palace mapmaker with an extraordinary gift. Seattle Times reviewer Wright called it “an enchanting historical fantasy adventure that combines an unconventional love story with a thoughtful exploration of faith and religious tolerance.”

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