Skip to main contentSkip to main content

Passing legislation to protect same-sex marriages in the Senate was a monthslong effort, building on a decadeslong push. Wisconsin Sen. Tammy Baldwin and four other senators implored their colleagues to tweak the bill to make it more appealing and enlisted key outside allies to help. In the end, they “defied political gravity,” as Baldwin puts it. The bill passed the Senate Nov. 30. Twelve Republicans supported the bill, two more than they needed to break the filibuster in the 50-50 Senate and pass it. The House passed the bill again Thursday and sent it to President Joe Biden.

Brittney Griner has returned to the United States, nearly 10 months after the basketball star’s detention in Russia made her the most high-profile American jailed abroad and set off a political firestorm. Griner’s status as an openly gay Black woman, her prominence in women’s basketball and her imprisonment in a country where authorities have been hostile to the LBGTQ community brought tremendous attention to her case. Moscow’s invasion of Ukraine after her arrest complicated matters further. The deal saw Griner exchanged Thursday for notorious arms dealer Viktor Bout. But the U.S. failed to win freedom for another American. Asked if more such swaps could happen, Russian President Vladimir Putin said Friday that “everything is possible.”

Serbia’s prime minister says the country’s leadership is close to demanding the deployment of their security troops to Kosovo. Serbian Prime Minister Ana Brnabic accused the NATO-led peacekeepers in Kosovo of failing to protect the lives of minority Serbs there. The return of Belgrade’s troops to the former Serbian province could dramatically increase tensions in the Balkans. Serbian officials claim a U.N. resolution that formally ended the country’s bloody crackdown against majority Kosovo Albanian separatists in 1999 allows for some 1,000 Serb troops to return to Kosovo. The peacekeeping force would have to give a green light for Serb troops to go into Kosovo, something highly unlikely to happen. Kosovo declared independence in 2008.

Portugal’s parliament has voted for the third time in almost two years in favor of allowing euthanasia. But as happened in the previous attempts the country’s Constitutional Court or president could stop Friday's bill becoming law. Lawmakers approved a bill permitting euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. Left-of-center parties in the mostly Catholic country were the driving force behind the bill, as they were with laws allowing abortion in 2007 and same-sex marriage in 2010. The bill requires the head of state’s approval to become law. He could also send it once more to the Constitutional Court for vetting. That could hold up a final decision for several months.

Passing legislation to protect same-sex marriages in the Senate was a monthslong effort, building on a decadeslong push. Wisconsin Sen. Tammy Baldwin and four other senators implored their colleagues to tweak the bill to make it more appealing and enlisted key outside allies to help. In the end, they “defied political gravity,” as Baldwin puts it. The bill passed the Senate Nov. 30. Twelve Republicans supported the bill, two more than they needed to break the filibuster in the 50-50 Senate and pass it. The House passed the bill again Thursday and sent it to President Joe Biden.

Duke Energy said no property damage was found at a Duke Energy facility in South Carolina after reports of gunfire nearby. Thousands of Duke Energy customers in neighboring North Carolina lost power over the weekend after authorities said one or more people drove up to two substations, breached the gates and opened fire. A company statement said Duke Energy is aware of reports of gunfire Wednesday near the Wateree Hydro Station in Ridgeway, South Carolina. The company statement says no one was harmed, no outages were reported and there was no known property damage. The company said it is working with the FBI.

Hundreds of people were rattled by an earthquake late Wednesday in the North Carolina mountains 100 miles west of Charlotte, according to the U.S. Geological Survey. The ripple effect was felt at least 271 miles away, in the southeastern part of the state, officials say. It happened at 10:23 p.m. Wednesday, Dec. 7, and registered as a 2.7 magnitude, which is considered mild. No damage was ...

Affiliate

Get up-to-the-minute news sent straight to your device.

Topics

Breaking News

News Alert